The University of Alabama
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A poem, Reveries, written by T. Y. K. in Chicago about an old bachelor who lives in his dreams to dispell his loneliness.
Postcard from Elizabeth ("Betty") M. Karcher in Alhambra, California, on 19 February 1943, to her family in Battle Creek. Michigan, telling them that she would be starting an aircraft drafting course the following month.
Contract making Kate Beatty, a Tuscaloosa, Alabama, resident, a member of the Birmingham Bridal Gift Association. This Association had annual dues and presented brides with a cash gift at the time of marriage.
Letter from Mrs. S. G. Kean of Richmond, Virginia, in 1877, to Mrs. Daniel London also of Richmond, discussing her nurse/servant and accommodations for an upcoming trip.
Diploma awarded in 1858 to Susan E. Kean, by the La Grange Female College in La Grange, Tennessee.
Credentials of James W. Keating's appointment by Secretary of State, John Hay, as Consular Agent to Port aux Basques, Newfoundland, in 1902.
Seven letters sent to Edwin Keiger of the 53rd North Carolina Regiment, 1862-1863.
One letter written by Francis William Kellogg to the Secretary of the United States Navy recommending Malcolm Maurice Moore to the Naval School at Annapolis.
Originally used by R. G. Betsill, a physician in Pike County, Alabama, as a record of his patients' treatments and accounts in 1855, the volume was used by Mary C. Kelly as a scrapbook in 1866.
Memory book kept by a young woman in Tuskegee, Alabama. Entries span between 1861 -- 1866 and include several by Confederate soldiers.
Notebook of poems written by Harriet Anna Kennedy between 1863-1864. A letter and a small collection of later poems written by Kennedy and members of her extended family are also included.
This collection contains letters to Margaret Kennedy from two airmen, Homer Hendon and Harold Wallace. The letters discuss life in military service at Maxwell airfield in Alabama.
Jane Kent used this notebook during her college studies of English: Shakespeare, Modern Drama, Essays of Francis Bacon, and classical poetry.
John L. Kent of Garnerville, New York, wrote to Lewis Ottenberg about stamp collecting. The letter is on common paper, but the elaborate letterhead appears to be hand drawn in black with green and yellow accents.
Three early 20th century postcards depict colorized photographic scenes of Louisville, Kentucky, with images of Union Depot, Wharfboat, and U.S. Life-Saving Station, and the City of Louisville steamboat. A fourth postcard depicts Boone's Ferry on the Kentucky River.
One letter written from Ma in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, to William Kenyon (presumably her son) in Lebanon, New Hampshire. She tells news of family and friends and mentions she and Pa will be home soon. Letter mentions a major fire in Canaan, New Hampshire.
Contains approximately fifty letters written by and to the King family of Dayton, Ohio. In addition to the letters written by family members, there are eleven letters from Helen Elie Smith, a onetime girlfriend of Robert Jr., and others from friends and extended family members. Early letters show the late engagement and young married life of Mr. and Mrs. King and include the letters they wrote to their young children while traveling. Many letters were written by the children during their years in various New England boarding schools. The sons also wrote of their experiences in the armed forces during World War II. Louis was stationed in New Orleans while Robert Jr. trained to be a pilot for the Air Transport Command in Las Vegas, New Mexico. The collection also includes newspaper clippings featuring various grandchildren, a telegram, a postcard, and promotional material for commemorative stamps.
Includes the papers of the King family of Perry County, Alabama, who owned plantations and other businesses.
A letter dated 21 March 1862, from the Marine Hospital in Vicksburg, Mississippi, to his brother. It requests money for tobacco and other necessaries. Printed on patriotic stationery; the last page has the song "Run , Yank, or Die," composed by T.W. Crowson of the Alabama Hickories, printed on it.
Color print of a drawing of Martin Luther King, Jr., by C. Downey that includes the poem He Changed the Course of History by Tommye Nious.
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