JONES, ALLEN WOODROW, 1930-

Biography:

Historian, university professor. Born– August 14, 1930, Andalusia. Parents–Arthur Green and Pearl Fryar Jones. Married– 1953. Children– Three. Education– Auburn University, B.S., 1951, M.A., 1953; University of Alabama, Ph.D., 1964. Taught for the overseas branch of the University of Maryland, 1955-1956; Montgomery Center, University of Alabama, 1959-1960; Furman University, 1960-1966; Auburn University, 1966-1991; Archivist, Auburn University. Member; Board of Advisors, Alabama Historical Commission; Southern History Association; Society of American Archivists; Organization of American Historians; Oral History Association; American Association for State and Local History; contributor to historical journals. Awarded emeritus status on his retirement from Auburn University in 1991.

Source:

Directory of American Scholars, 1977.

Publication(s):

Auburn University Through the Years, 1856-1973. Auburn, Ala.; Auburn University, 1973.

A History of the Direct Primary in Alabama, 1840-1903. Tuscaloosa, Ala.; s.n., 1964.

Location and Classification and Dates of Military Events in Alabama, 1861-1865. Alabama Civil War Centennial Commission, 1961.

JONES, BILL (WILLIAM GROVER, JR.), 1922-2015

Biography:

Journalist; political staff member. Born– Apr. 24, 1922, Woodville, Ala. Parents– William Grover Sr. and Amanda Graham (Flanagan) Jones. Married– Vera Jean Baird, May 28, 1950. Children– Three. Education– University of Alabama, A.B., 1943. U.S. Army, 1942-1945; newspaper reporter and editor; wrote for several Alabama papers; owner of the Walker County Times, 1945-1960; printing and supply business, 1960-1963; administrative aide to U.S. Representative Carl Elliott, 1955-56. Press secretary and campaign aide to Governor George Wallace, 1962-65. Owned and operated Viewpoint Publications, publisher of Alabama and Georgia History textbooks, after 1967; Viewpoint Enterprises, a political consulting firm, after 1969. Member Junior Chamber of Commerce; Jasper Kiwanis; American Legion (Commander, Alabama Department), and other civic organizations. Died January 23, 2015.

Source: Files at Alabama Dept. of Archives and History; obituary

Publication(s): The Wallace Story. Northport, Ala.; American Southern, 1966.

JONES, EZRA EARL, 1939-

Biography:

Clergyman. Born– December 30, 1939, Birmingham. Parents– Ezra Elith and Eunice (Minor) Jones. Married– Mary Elizabeth Slaughter, September 11, 1960. Children– Two. Education– Birmingham Southern College, B.A., 1960; Duke University, B.D., 1963; Drew University, Th.M., 1964, further study, 1966-1968; Northwestern University, Ph.D., 1971. Piano and choral instructor, 1956-1960; ordained, United Methodist Church, 1964; Methodist minister in Alabama churches, 1958-1960, 1964-1966; North Carolina churches, 1960-1964; New Jersey churches, 1966-1968; taught, Garrett Theological Seminary, 1969-1970; Associate Director of Research, United Methodist Board of Global Ministries, New York, N.Y., 1970-. Member; American Sociological Association; American Religious Research Association.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online

Publication(s):

Analysis of Significant Relationships in the Attitudes of United Methodist Clergy and Laity Toward Social and Political Issues. Ann Arbor, Mich.; University Microfilms, 1972.

The Church and Extremism. New York; National Division of the Board of Missions, United Methodist Church, 1970.

Methodism in Santa Fe, New Mexico. New York; Dept. of Research and Survey, etc., 1973.

New Church Development in the Eighties; Some Perspectives from the Seventies. Cincinnati; Board of Global Ministries, United Methodist Church, 1976.

Planning for the Future; the United Methodist Churches, Madison, Wisconsin, 1973. Cincinnati; Office of Research and Survey, National Division, Board of Global Ministries, United Methodist Church, 1973.

Strategies for New Churches. New York; Harper, 1976.

A Study of Grace United Methodist Church, Kokomo, Indiana, 1974. Cincinnati; Office of Research and Survey, National Division, Board of Global Ministries, United Methodist Church, 1974.

Where Methodism Stands on Extremism. Cincinnati; Women’s Division of the Board of Missions, United Methodist Church, 1971.

Joint_Publication(s):

Management of Ministry. New York:  Harper, 1978.

Ministry of the Laity. New York:  Harper & Row, 1978.

What’s Ahead for Old First Church.  New York:  Harper, 1976.

You Are the Target. Cincinnati; Board of Missions, United Methodist Church, 1971.

Joint Editor;

Sources and Shapes of Power. Nashville;  Abingdon, 1981.

JONES, JOHN MAXWELL, JR., 1921-2000

Biography:

Historian, linguist, teacher. Born– January 1, 1921, Atmore. Parents–  John Maxwell Jones Sr. and Marjorie Leonidas Brooks Jones. Education– University of Alabama, B.A., 1942, M.A., 1954; University College of North Wales, Bangor; University of Brussels; Institut de Touraine, Diplome d’Etude Francaises. Served in an anti-aircraft battalion in Europe in World War II Taught foreign languages in high schools in Alabama, the Carolinas, and Delaware until 1968; taught at Glassboro State College, 1968-. Died July 4, 2000.

Source:

History and Genealogy of the Jones and Brooks Families….

Publication(s):

Academic Freedom and the Secondary-School Teacher, and Other Heretical Essays on Education. Philadelphia; G. H. Buchanan Co., 1966.

A Critical Study of the Novels of W. Leslie Richards. Philadelphia; s.n., 1970.

History and Genealogy of the Jones and Brooks Families of Escambia County, Alabama; …. Camden, N.J.; Jones, 1977.

Slavery and Race in Nineteenth-Century Louisiana-French Literature. Camden, N.J.; Jones, 1978.

Joint_Publication(s):

The Carillon Satires; November 2, 1873-May 17, 1874. Camden, N.J.; Jones, 1978.

JONES, MADISON PERCY, JR., 1925-2012.

Biography:

Writer. Born– March 21, 1925, Nashville, Tenn. Parents– Madison Percy and Mary Temple (Webber) Jones. Married– Shailah McEvilley, February 5, 1951. Children– Five. Education– Vanderbilt University, A.B., 1949; A.M., 1951; University of Florida, post-graduate study, 1951-1953. U.S. Army, 1945-1946; taught Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, 1953-1954; University of Tennessee, 1954-1956; Auburn University, 1956-87.  Wrote short stories, essays, and reviews published in anthologies and periodicals. Sewanee Review fellow, 1954-1955; Rockefeller Foundation fellow, 1968; Guggenheim Foundation fellow, 1973. Member; Board of Directors, Alabama Council on the Arts and Humanities; South Atlantic Modern Language Association; Fellowship of Southern Writers; Alabama Writers’ Forum.  Professor emeritus, Auburn University, 1987. Michael Shaara Award for Civil War Fiction, U. S. Civil War Center, 1998. T.S. Eliot Award for Creative Writing, Ingersoll Foundation, 1998. Harper Lee Award for Alabama Distinguished writer, Alabama Writer’s Symposium, 1999. Died July 9, 2012.

Source:

Who’s Who in America, 1980; Writers Directory, 1980; Contemporary Authors online.

Publication(s):

A Buried Land. New York; Viking, 1963.

A Cry of Absence. New York; Crown, 1971.

An Exile. New York; Viking, 1967. (Also published as I Walk the Line)

Forest of the Night. New York; Harcourt, Brace, 1960.

Herod’s Wife:  A Novel.  Tuscaloosa; University of Alabama Press, 2003.

History of the Tennessee State Dental Association. Nashville; Tennessee Dental Association, 1958.

The Innocent. New York; Harcourt, Brace, 1957.

Last Things. Baton Rouge, La.; Louisiana State University Press, 1989.

Nashville, 1864: The Dying of the Light: A novel.  Nashville: J.S. Sanders, 1997.

Passage Through Gehenna. Baton Rouge, La.; Louisiana State University Press, 1978.

Season of the Strangler. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, 1982.

To the Winds; A Novel.  Atlanta; Longstreet Press, 1996.

Papers;

Collections of manuscripts of Madison Jones are held by the libraries at Auburn University and Emory University.

JONES, MARGARET JEAN, 1936-2009

Biography:

Freelance journalist; advocate for the handicapped. Born– March 27, 1936, Baileytown, Cullman County. Parents– Selmer B. and Alma Ruth (Ford) Jones. Education– Fairview High School; correspondence courses in journalism. Stricken at age seven with myosistis ossificans progressiva, which left her completely paralyzed by the age of eighteen. Published many articles in journals; wrote a newspaper column “Through the Looking Glass,” for the Cullman Times; edited the Alabama Wheelchair Society Magazine. Member of Writers Conclave of Alabama.  One of the organizers of a vocational workshop for the handicapped, the Margaret Jean Jones Adult Activities Center; was president of its board for two years. Won two Freedom Foundation medals for published essays; listed in Outstanding Young Women of America, 1970; named Cullman Times Citizen of the Year, 2000. Died March 16, 2009.

Source:

The World in My Mirror; jacket of Combing Cullman County; obituary, Cullman Times, March 2009.

Publication(s):

Combing Cullman County. Cullman, Ala.; Modernistic Printers, 1972.

Cullman County Across the Years. Cullman, Ala.; Modernistic Printers, 1975.

The World in My Mirror. Nashville; Abingdon, 1979.

JONES, MARY MARTIN, 1916-1983

Biography:

High school teacher; hospital and office worker.  Born– Anniston, February 4, 1916. Parents–Edwin and Sallie W. Martin. Married– Lynn Jones. Education– Anniston High School; B.S., Huntingdon College. Moved away from Anniston for some time, but returned for three years in the 1950′s and worked at Anniston Memorial Hospital. In 1954, moved to California. Died October 30, 1983.

Source:

Book jacket, Adventures of Butch and Pillow;  Obituary in Anniston Star, November 3, 1983.

Publication(s):

The Adventures of Butch and Pillow. New York; Vantage, 1971.

JONES, MOLLIE HOLLIFIELD, 1884-1963

Biography:

Teacher; civic leader. Born– September 14, 1884, Auburn. Parents– Henry Addison and Mary (Teague) Hollifield. Married– Herman Douglas Jones, August 22, 1925. Education– Alabama Polytechnic Institute, B.S., 1902, M.S., 1905; graduate work in botany at University of California, 1911, and Columbia University, 1915, 1920 and 1927. Taught Latin and French in high schools in Dothan, Gadsden, and Montgomery, and in Danville, Va., 1913-1925.  Member and officer, UDC and DAR; National League of American Pen Women; Alabama Writers’ Conclave; Poetry Society of Alabama; Methodist Church. Died October 21, 1963.

Source:

Grove’s Library of Alabama Lives.

Publication(s):

Auburn, Loveliest Village of the Plain. Auburn, Ala.; Bulletin Publishing Co., 1955.

Portrait of a Southern Lady:  A Tribute to Mrs. B.B.Ross.  Auburn, 1947.

Joint_Publications;

A history of the Methodist Church, Auburn, Alabama, 1836-1944.  Auburn, 1954.

Papers;

The Department of Special Collections at the Ralph Brown Draughon Library at Auburn University holds a collection of the papers of Mollie Hollifield Jones’ participation in the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

JONES, ROBERT (BOB) REYNOLDS, 1883-1968

Biography:

Evangelist, religious broadcaster, college founder and president.  Born– Oct. 30, 1883, Skipperville, Ala. Parents– William Alexander and Georgia (Creel) Jones. Married– Bernice Sheffield, Oct. 24, 1905 (died 1906). Married– Mary Gaston Stollenwerck, June 17, 1908. Children– One. Education–Mallalieu Seminary[secondary school], Kinsey, Alabama, graduated 1900. Southern University, Greensboro, 1901-1904. Licensed to preach in the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1898. Active as an evangelist, 1902-1968, in every state and thirty foreign countries; made weekly radio broadcasts in the U.S. and abroad. Founded Bob Jones University in Lynn Haven, Florida, 1927; moved to Cleveland, Tenn., 1933; to Greenville, S.C., 1947.  Served as president of Bob Jones College, later University, until his retirement in 1966.  Founder, International Association, Young People’s Fellowship Clubs and the Gospel Fellowship Association; president, Interdenominational Evangelistic Association; editor and publisher, The Fellowship News; contributor to many newspapers. Awarded the D.D. degree by Muskingum College, 1921; LL.D. by John Brown University, 1941. Died January 16, 1968.

Source:

Marquis who’s who online; Owen’s The Story of Alabama; American National Biography online; wikipedia.

Publication(s):

Bob Jones’ Sermons.  Montgomery:  Paragon, 1911.

Comments on Here and Hereafter. New York; Loiseaux, 1942.

Sowing and Reaping: A Sermon to Men. Paragon, 1914.

Things I Have Learned. New York; Loiseaux Bros., 1944.

Papers;

The papers of Bob Jones are held at Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina.

JONES, SAMUEL B., JR., 1933-2016

Biography:

Botanist, professor of botany. Born– Dec. 18, 1933, Roswell, Ga. Parents–Samuel B. Jones Sr. and Mary Bell Nichols Jones.  Married–Carleen Arrington, 1955.  Children–three. Education– Auburn University, B.S., 1955, M.S., 1961; University of Georgia, Ph.D., 1964. Served in US Army and US Army Reserves; retired at rank of lieutenant colonel. Taught at South Cobb High School (Ga.), 1958-1959; Auburn University, 1959-1961; University of Southern Mississippi, 1964-1967; University of Georgia, 1967-91; Director, Botanical Garden, University of Georgia, 1981-1991. With his wife founded Picadilly Farm Nursery and Gardens in the early 1980′s; received several awards for its work: the Perennial Plant Award of Merit, 2005, and the Award of Merit from the American Conifer Society. Recipient of a Callaway Foundation Research Grant. Member; Botanical Society of America; American Society of Plant Taxonomists; International Association of Plant Taxonomists; Sorrey Botanical Club.  Awarded emeritus status on his retirement from the University of Georgia. Died February 9, 2016.

Source:

American Men and Women of Science, 1982; obituary.

Joint_Publication(s):

Checklist of the Vascular Flora of Clarke County, Georgia. S.l.; s.n., 1980?

Conspectus and Index to Families–Tribe Vernonieae. Chicago; s.n., s.d.

Field Museum of Natural History, 1980. S.l.; s.n., s.d.

Gardening with Native Wild Flowers. Portland, Ore.; Timber Press, 1990.

List of Georgia Plants in the University of Georgia Herbarium. Athens, Ga.; Dept. of Botany, Univ. of Georgia, 1979.

Native Shrubs and Woody Vines of the Southeast, Landscaping Uses and Identifications. Portland, Ore.; Timber Press, 1989.

Plant Systematics. New York; McGraw-Hill, 1979.

Papers;

The Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Georgia holds a collection of papers of Samuel B. Jones Jr.

JONES, THOMAS G., 1874-1970

Biography:

Methodist Clergyman. Born– Ozark, Ala., 1874.  Parents–Thomas Charles Jones.   Married– Laura Elizabeth Carr, June 15, 1905.  Children– Four. Education– Troy State Teachers College; Southern University. Worked as farmhand, logger, teacher, then became a Methodist minister and served as a pastor for over forty years, with churches at Luverne, Lapine, Abbeville, Opp, Elba, Wetumpka, Clanton, Demopolis, Hartford, Florala, Opelika, Greenville, Dothan, Panama City. Retired by 1961. Executive secretary, State Commission on Alcoholism. Died June 5, 1970.

Source:

Files at the Alabama Dept. of Archives and History; ancestry.com

Publication(s):

The Charms of Winning. Birmingham, Ala.; Birmingham Printing Co., 1939.

Dash for Freedom. New York; Exposition Press, 1951.

JONES, VIRGIL (PAT) CARRINGTON, 1906-1999.

Biography:

Journalist. Born– June 7, 1906, Charlottesville, Va. Parents– Alonzo Lewis and Virginia (Graves) Jones. Married– Geneva Carolyn Peyton, 1934. Children– Two. Education– Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1924-1926; Washington and Lee University, B.A., 1930. City editor, Huntsville (Ala.) Times, 1931-1937; reporter, Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., 1937-1941; reporter, Evening Star, Washington, D.C., 1941-1945; staff writer, Washington, Wall Street Journal, 1943-1945; office manager, Curtis Publishing Co., Washington, 1945-1961; administrative assistant to Congressman William M. Tuck of Virginia, 1963-69; staff writer, NASA Activities, 1969-76. Member; National Press Club; Masons; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Delta Chi. District of Columbia Civil War Round Table gold medal for meritorious writing. Used the pseudonym, Pat Jones, for some writing.  Died November 29, 1999.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online.

Publication(s):

Birth of Liberty. New York; Holt, 1964.

The Civil War at Sea. New York; Holt, 1960-1962.

Eight Hours Before Richmond. New York; Holt, 1957.

Gray Ghosts and Rebel Raiders. New York; Holt, 1956.

The Hatfields and the McCoys. Chapel Hill, N.C.; University of North Carolina Press, 1948.

100 Years After. Washington, D.C.; Bicentennial Commission, 1965.

Ranger Mosby. Chapel Hill, N.C.; University of North Carolina Press, 1944.

Roosevelt’s Rough Riders. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, 1971.

The Story of Mooresville. Decatur, Ala.; North Alabama Historical Association, 1968.

True Tales of Old Madison County (Alabama); …. Huntsville, Ala.; Johnson Historical Publications, 1970.

U.S.S. Cairo; the Story of a Civil War Gunboat, …. Washington, D.C.; National Park Service, 1971.

JONES, WALTER BURGWYN, 1888-1963

Biography:

Attorney, judge. Born– Oct. 16, 1888, Montgomery, Ala. Parents– Thomas Goode (later governor of Alabama) and Georgene Caroline (Bird) Jones. Education– Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1906-1907; University of Alabama Law School, L.L.B., 1909. Active in elective, appointive, and volunteer positions in state and civic organizations. Appointed Judge of the 15th Judicial Circuit, Montgomery County, 1920; presiding judge, 1935-. Began a weekly column, “Off the Bench” for the Montgomery Advertiser in 1924; chairman, Board of Trustees, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History, 1945; fellow of the American Bar Association; member, American Law Institute; president, Alabama State Bar, 1954-1955; founder, Jones Law School, Montgomery, 1928; founder, Alabama Lawyer, official publication of the Alabama State Bar, 1940. Member; St. John’s Episcopal Church, Montgomery, and senior warden and teacher of the Young Men’s Bible Class. Awarded an honorary L.L.D., University of Alabama, 1955. Died August 1, 1963.

Source:

Grove’s Library of Alabama Lives.

Publication(s):

Addresses and Papers of Judge Walter B. Jones. Montgomery, Ala.; s.n., 1944.

Alabama Circuit Judges Handbook. Montgomery, Ala.; s.n., 1953.

Alabama Jury Instructions, with Forms. 2 vols. St. Paul, Minn.; West, 1953.

Alabama Lawyers Handbook. Montgomery, Ala.; Junior Bar of Alabama, 1944.

Alabama Pleading and Practice at Law. Montgomery, Ala.; s.n., 1961.

Alabama Practice and Forms; …. St. Paul, Minn.; West, 1947.

Citizenship and Voting in Alabama; …. Montgomery, Ala.; American Citizens Press, 1947.

Equity Pleading and Practice. S.l.; s.n., 1954.

Huntly Cabin Papers. Montgomery, Ala.; s.n., 1955.

A Student’s Equity Pleading. Montgomery, Ala.; s.n., 1923.

Editor:

Confederate War Poems. Montgomery, Ala.; s.n., 1959.

JONES, WILLIAM McKENDREY, 1927-2011

Biography:

Writer; literary scholar; university professor. Born– Sept. 19, 1927, Dothan, Ala. Parents– William M. and Margaret (Farmer) Jones. Married– Ruth Ann Roberts, Aug. 14, 1952. Children– Three. Education– University of Alabama, B.A., 1950; Northwestern University, Ph.D., 1953. Served in U. S. Army, 1945-46. Taught English, Wisconsin State College at Eau Claire, 1953-55; University of Michigan, 1955-59; University of Missouri, 1959-1989. Folger Shakespeare Library research fellow, 1955. Member; Modern Language Association of America; Renaissance Society of America; Shakespeare Society of America; Authors Guild; Authors League of America. Died August 18, 2011.

Source: Contemporary Authors online; obituary

Publication(s):

Guide to Living Power. Atlanta; John Knox, 1975.

John Steinbeck. Charlottesville, Va.; Samkar Press, 1982.

Protestant Romances; Patterns of Reality in the Prose of Sir Giovanni Francesco Blondi. Lawrence, Kan.; Coronado Press, 1980.

Speaking Up in Church. Nashville; Broadman, 1977.

Survival; a Manual on Manipulating. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.; Prentice-Hall, 1979.

Joint_Publication(s):

Living in Love; a Guide to Realistic Christian Marriage. Atlanta; John Knox, 1976.

Two Careers–One Marriage.  New York: AMACOM, 1980.

Editor;

Fiction; Form and Experience. Boston; Heath, 1969.

The Present State of Scholarship in Sixteenth-Century Literature. Columbia; University of Missouri Press, 1978.

Stages of Composition. Boston; Heath, 1964.

JONES, ZELON B., 1909-1986

Biography:

Teacher. Born– Oct. 2, 1909, Alexander City, Ala. Parents– George and Flossie (Cannon) Bailey. Married– David A. Jones, Sept. 20, 1930. Children– Three. Education– Jacksonville State University. Taught first grade at small schools and at Sylavon, B.B. Comer, and Main Avenue Schools in Sylacauga, retiring in 1965. Wrote down anecdotes and was convinced by friends to put them in book form. Died July 5, 1986.

Source:

B.B. Comer Memorial Library, Sylacauga, Ala.; Shirley K. Spears, Director.

Publication(s):

So It Was. Philadelphia; Dorrance, 1975.

JORDAN, WEYMOUTH TYREE, 1912-1968

Biography:

Historian, agriculturalist, teacher. Born– Oct. 31, 1912, Hamlet, N.C. Parents– William Daniel and Etta Mary (Utley) Jordan. Married– Louise Elizabeth Riggan, Aug. 11, 1935. Children– Three. Education– North Carolina State College, B.S., 1933; Vanderbilt University, M.A., 1934, Ph.D., 1937; postdoctoral study, Graduate School, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, 1947, and Iowa State College, 1948. Taught in Kentucky, North Carolina, and at Judson College, 1938-1940; Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1941-1949; Florida State University,  1949-1968. Head of the FSU department of history, 1955-64. Received research grants for the study of pre-Civil War plantation practices, plantation medicine in the old South, and  Southern agriculture. Authored a number of articles and reviews. Member; Organization of American Historians; American Studies Association; American, Southern, Mississippi Valley, Alabama, and Florida historical associations; and others. Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Died November 22, 1968.

Source:

Who’s Who online.

Publication(s):

Ante-Bellum Alabama; Town and Country. Tallahassee, Fla.; Florida State University, 1957.

George Washington Campbell of Tennessee– Western Statesman. Tallahassee, Fla.; Florida State University, 1955.

Herbs, Hoecakes, and Husbandry; the Daybook of a Planter of the Old South. Tallahassee, Fla.; Florida State University, 1960.

Hugh Davis and His Alabama Plantation. Tuscaloosa, Ala.; University of Alabama Press, 1948.

North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865; a Roster. Raleigh, N.C.; State Dept. of Archives and History, 1966.

Rebels in the Making; Planters’ Conventions and Southern Propaganda. Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Confederate Pub. Co., 1958.

The United States, 1783-1861; From Revolution to Civil War. New York; Pageant Press, 1964.

Papers;

A collection of the papers of Weymouth Tyree Jordan is held by the library at Florida State University.

JORDAN, WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER, 1834-1923

Biography:

Farmer; state legislator. Born– July 10, 1834, Talbotton, Ga. Parents– Thomas George and Mary Lovicy (Chambliss) Jordan. Married–Frances  Anne Thornton, Feb. 14, 1856. Children– Thirteen. Education– Tutored by sisters and neighbors; Male Institute, Glenville, Ala., 1858-1862. Family moved to Alabama and lived in Society Hill, Eufaula, and Midway.  Served in Company B, 15th Alabama, Confederate States Army. Farmed at Midway, Bullock County, beginning at age eighteen. Alabama Legislator, 1884-1889. Died September 22, 1923.

Source:

Owen’s Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Vol. 3; findagrave.com; ancestry.com

Publication(s):

Some Events and Incidents During the Civil War. Montgomery, Ala; Paragon Press, 1909.

JULICH, DOROTHY LOUISE MILAM, 1912-2011.

Biography:

Executive secretary; genealogist.  Born– Jan. 1, 1912, Decatur, Ala. Parents– Eugene Edward and Perkins (Stroup) Milam. Married– Jule M. Julich, June 11, 1936. Children– Three. Education– Blackwood Davis Business University, Oklahoma City; John Calhoun Junior College, Decatur, Ala.; University of Alabama Extension Center in Huntsville. Executive Secretary, Oklahoma Natural Gas Corp., Oklahoma Dept. of Public Welfare, Office of Price Administration, and Kansas State Superintendent of Education, all within the period 1931-1946; Chief Clerk, Selective Service, Topeka, Kan., 1946-1948; Secretary, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Topeka, 1948-1950; Redstone Arsenal, Ala., 1950-1971, as secretary and administrative assistant to the resident engineer, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, secretary and personal assistant to the deputy commanding general, and to the commanding general, U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency, and executive secretary, U.S. Army Missile Command. Retired, 1971.  Wrote a column “Southern Kinfolks,” which was published in the Decatur Daily, Decatur Free Press, and Hartselle Enquirer.  Member UDC, DAR, and Colonial Dames; state president and international vice-president of Business and Professional Women.  Received the Elmer Minter Award from the Morgan County Genealogy Society, 2010.  Died May 28, 2011.

Source:

Who’s Who in Alabama, Vol. 3.  Obituary, dignitymemorial.com

Publication(s):

Alabama Kinfolks. Cullman, Ala; Gregath Co., 1983.

Crow and Stroup, South Carolina to Alabama, 1818.  Cullman: Gregath, 1984.

Editor_and_Compiler:

Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers and Patriots in Alabama. Montgomery: Parchment Press, 1979.

KAHN, LAWRENCE, 1921-

Biography:

Physician, medical educator, writer. Born– July 16, 1921, New York, N.Y. (Grew up in Gadsden, where his family moved when he was seven).  Parents–Benjamin and Rose Kahn.  Married– Jane Sherman, June 3, 1943. Children– Three. Education– University of Alabama, A.B., 1941; spent a postgraduate year at UA in Hudson Strode’s creative writing program;  Louisiana State University College of Medicine, M.D., 1945; residency, St. Louis Children’s Hospital. U.S. Army Medical Corps, 1946-1948 (assigned to the VA hospital in Tuscaloosa); practiced pediatrics, 1951-1970; taught, Washington University School of Medicine. Editor of a section in Clinical Pediatrics, 1968-1970; reviewer, American Journal of Public Health, 1975-; authored a number of articles in medical publications.

Source:

Kahn’s curriculum vitae.

Publication(s):

Stonewall ‘Gator. University, Ala.; L. Raines, 1942.

Contributor;

Spring Harvest: A Collection of Stories from Alabama.  Ed. Hudson Strode.  New York; A. A. Knopf, 1944.

KALNOKY, INGEBORG LOUISE, 1909-1997

Biography:

Artist, bookkeeper, statistician. Born– Jan. 27, 1909, Metz, France. Parents– Dietrich and Hertha (Rasmuss) von Breitenbuch, of Germany. Married– Count Hugo Kalnoky, of Hungary, June 24, 1934. Children– Four. Education– Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, 1931-1933; studied art in Berlin, 1933-1934. She and her husband opposed the Nazis and were forced to flee Budapest. After World War II, she supervised two homes for the witnesses at the International Tribunal in Nuremberg, Germany, 1945-1947, and this experience formed the basis of her book. Moved to the U.S., 1949. Wrote a series, Die Zeugen von Nurnberg (The Witnesses at Nurnberg) for newspapers in Germany in 1946. Statistician, Olen Co., Mobile, Ala., 1954-1959; Jiffy, Inc., 1959-67; Alabama Board of Health in Mobile, 1967-68; Head Bookkeeper, E.H. Smith & Sons, 1970-. Died July 1, 1997.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online; Mobile Press Register, Jan. 12, 1975.

Publication(s):

The Guest House. Indianapolis, Ind.; Bobbs-Merrill, 1974.

KANELOS, FRANK THEODORE, 1948-

Biography:

Speech-language pathologist, poet. Born– Dec. 23, 1948. Parents– Theodore and Maruka Kanelos. Married–Janice Rice.  Education– University of Alabama, B.A., 1971; Southern Methodist University, M.S., 1975. Worked for the Birmingham Public Library, then as a speech-language pathologist. Author of poems published in periodicals, newspapers, and anthologies. Editor of poetry journal Dear Magnolia.

Source:

Frank T. Kanelos, Birmingham, Ala.

Publication(s):

Opening Doors. New York; Vantage Press, 1982.

Until the Vacancies Are Filled.  Birmingham:  Dear Magnolia Press, 1992.

Yesterday’s Toys. Chicago; Adams Press, 1984.

KATZ, ELAINE SCHOENBERGER

Biography:

Folklorist; college professor. Born– Luxembourg. Came to the US around 1940. Parents–Davin and Ilse Schoenberger. Married– George Katz. Children– Three. Education– Northwestern University, B.A.; University of Alabama, M.A., 1962, Ph.D., 1978. Lived in Germany and England, then in New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Michigan, and Illinois before settling in Selma, Ala. Taught at the University of Alabama and Shelton State Community College. Member, American Folklore Society; National Council for the Traditional Arts; Tannehill Experimental Learning Advisory Board. Coordinator; “Folklorama ’75,” a multimedia exhibit of Alabama folklore and folk art.

Source:

Folklore for the Time of Your Life.

Publication(s):

Folklore for the Time of Your Life. Birmingham, Ala.; Oxmoor House, 1978.

Editor_ and_ Compiler;

The Kentuck Sampler. Northport, Ala.; Chamber of Commerce, 1975.

KATZ, HAROLD K., 1909-2000

Biography:

Engineer, civil servant. Born– Apr. 6, 1909, Warrensburg, N.Y.  Parents– Abraham and Anna Katz. Married– Louise Dubes. Children– One. Education– Union College, B.S., E.E. Worked for the Federal government in military and civilian capacities; retired from civil service after 36 years. Moved to Guntersville, Ala., 1958. Trustee, Guntersville Public Library; delegate; Alabama Governor’s Conference on Libraries and Information Services. Served as chair, Guntersville United Way. Awarded Citizen of the Year, Guntersville Pilot Club, 1975. Published articles in periodicals. Died January 13, 2000.

Source:

SCRIPSIT.

Joint_Publication(s):

A Trustee’s Manual for Use in Alabama Libraries. S.l.; Friends & Trustees, Alabama Library Association, 1970.

KAY, DONALD, 1939-

Biography:

Literary scholar; university professor. Born– Anderson County, South Carolina, Aug. 30, 1939. Parents– John Wayne and Louise (Norris) Kay. Married– Carol McGinnis, June 8, 1968. Children–one. Education– Presbyterian College, A.B., 1961; University of Tennessee, M.A., 1963, Ph.D., 1967. Taught English, University of Alabama, 1967-. Published more than two dozen essays.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online;  jacket of The Unknown Samuel Johnson.

Publication(s):

Short Fiction in The Spectator. Tuscaloosa, Ala.; University of Alabama Press, 1975.

Editor:

A Provision of Human Nature; Essays on Fielding and Others. Tuscaloosa, Ala.; University of Alabama Press, 1977.

Joint_Editor:

The Unknown Samuel Johnson. Madison, Wisc.; University of Wisconsin Press, 1983.

KEARLEY, FLOYD FURMAN, 1932-2003

Biography:

Clergyman, college professor of Bible. Born– Nov. 7, 1932, Montgomery, Ala. Parents– J. A. and Zelma (Suggs) Kearley. Married– Helen Bowman, June 18, 1951. Children– Two. Education– Alabama Christian College, B.A., 1954; Harding Graduate School, M.A., 1956, M.R.E. and M.Th., 1965; Auburn University, M.Ed., 1960; Hebrew Union College, Ph.D., 1971. Ordained in the Church of Christ, 1952. Taught at Alabama Christian College in Montgomery, 1956-1969; Lubbock Christian College, 1970-1975; Abilene Christian College, 1975-. Member; Society of Biblical Literature; American Association of Hebrew Professors; Rotary International; Phi Delta Kappa. F.W. Mattox Distinguished Professor award, Lubbock Christian College, 1974. Died March 1, 2003.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online; obituary

Publication(s):

The Effect of Evolution on Modern Society. S.l.; World Mission Pub., 1974.

God’s Indwelling Spirit. Birmingham, Ala.; Parchment Press, 1975.

The Significance of the Genesis Flood. S.l.; World Mission Pub., 1974.

The World and Literature of the Old Testament. Austin, Tex.; Sweet Pub. Co., 1979.

Editor_and_Contributor;

Biblical Interpretation, Principles and Practice. Grand Rapids, Mich.; Baker Book House, 1986.

KELLER, HELEN ADAMS, 1880-1968

Biography: 

Author, lecturer, political activist. Born– June 27, 1880, Tuscumbia, Ala. Parents– Arthur H. and Kate (Adams) Keller. Early illness deprived her of sight and hearing before the age of two. Education– Tutored by Anne Sullivan Macy through childhood; attended the Perkins Institute for the Blind, Boston, 1888-94; Wright-Humason School and Horace Mann School, New York, 1894-96; Cambridge  School for Young Ladies, 1896-1900;  Radcliffe College, A.B., 1904 (the first deaf-blind person awarded a B.A. in the US).   Worked as an advocate for various political causes and for the deaf, blind, and mute; published poems and essays in various periodicals and lectured extensively.  Member/supporter of the American Federation for the Blind, Helen Keller International, and the American Civil Liberties Union.  Received many honors and awards, including the LL. D. from Glasgow University in 1932, Litt. D. from Harvard in 1955; the French Legion of  Honor, 1952, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1964 (by President Lyndon B. Johnson).  Died June 1, 1968.

Source:

Longman’s Companion to Twentieth Century Literature; Who Was Who Among North American Authors, 1921-1939; Contemporary Authors online.

Publications;

Helen Keller; Her Socialist Years, Writings and Speeches. New York; International Publishers, 1967.

Helen Keller in Scotland. New York; Methuen, 1933.

Helen Keller’s Journal, 1936-1937. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, Doran, 1938.

If I Had Three Days to See. S.l.; s.n., 1934.

Let Us Have Faith. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, Doran, 1940.

Midstream, My Later Life. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, 1929.

My Religion. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, Page & Co., 1927.

The Open Door. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, 1957.

Optimism; an Essay. New York; Crowell, 1903. (Reprinted as My Key of Life, Optimism and also as The Practice of Optimism.)

Out of the Dark; Essays, Letters & Addresses …. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, Page, 1927.

Peace at Eventide. New York; Methuen, 1932.

The Song of the Stone Wall. London; Century Co., 1910.

The Story of My Life. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, Page & Co., 1903.

Teacher, Anne Sullivan Macy; a Tribute by the Foster Child of Her Mind. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, 1955.

To Love this Life:  Quotations.  New York, AFB Press, 2000.

The World I Live In. New York; Century Co., 1908.

Joint_Publications;

The Deliverer of Helen Keller; Anne Sullivan Macy. London; Frederick Mueller, 1934.

Editor_Translator;

A Challenge to Darkness; The Life Story of J. Georges Scapini.  Translated, with an introduction, by Helen Keller. Garden City, N. Y.:  Doubleday, 1929.

Papers;

 The papers of Helen Keller are held at the American Foundation for The Blind in New York City.

KELLING, FURN L., 1914-2000

Biography:

Teacher, writer. Born– Sept. 1, 1914, Shawnee, Okla. Parents– William E. and Grace L. (Craig) Kelling. Education– Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, certificate in elementary education, 1949; George Peabody College for Teachers, 1949-1950. Owner/operator of beauty shops in St. Louis, Mo., 1933-1947; kindergarten teacher, Knoxville, Tenn., 1950-1952; director of children’s work, Baptist Church, Birmingham, Ala., 1952-1955, and similar work for the Arizona Southern Baptist Convention, Phoenix, 1955-1957; director of children’s activities, Southern Baptist Convention of California, 1957-1960; similar positions in Oklahoma, California, Alabama and at the University of Nevada in Reno. Wrote for Baptist publications. Member; National Association for Nursery Education; National Education Association. Her children’s book, Listen to the Night, was included in a U.S. Cultural exhibit in Moscow in 1958. Died April 28, 2000.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online.

Publication(s):

Listen to the Night. Nashville; Broadman, 1957.

Prayer is …. Nashville; Broadman, 1963.

This is My Family. Nashville; Broadman, 1963.

KELLY, MAUD McLURE, 1887-1973

Biography:

Attorney. Born– June 26, 1887, Mountain Spring, Ala. Parents– Richard Bussey and Leona (Bledsoe) Kelly. Education– Noble Institute, Anniston, graduated 1904; worked as a stenographer in her father’s law practice; University of Alabama School of Law, graduated 1908. Admitted to the bar. 1908; became the first woman to practice law in Alabama; admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of Alabama, 1909; admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court, 1914, the first Southern woman so admitted. Practiced law, Birmingham, 1908-1918 and 1924-1931; legal staff of the U.S. Interior Dept., 1918-1924. Retired from the practice of law in 1931;  inspector of county records and acquisitions agent for Alabama Department of Archives and History, 1943-56. Active in the Democratic Party, and spoke at rallies and in campaigns; appointed, 1930, to organize the women Democrats of Alabama; represented Alabama as official hostess at the 1932 Democratic National Convention. Member; Alabama Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy; Daughters of the American Revolution; Alabama Society of the United States Daughters of 1812; Alabama Equal Suffrage Association; American Legion Auxiliary; and other cultural, patriotic and historical organizations. Named to Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame, 1990, and Alabama Lawyers’ Hall of Fame, 2014. Died April 2, 1973.

Source:

Owen’s The Story of Alabama, Vol. V. Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame website.

Publication(s):

Descent from Richard Pace of Pace’s Pains and Samuel Macock. S.l.; s.n. (typescript), 1947.

Compiler;

Lineage Book of the Alabama Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Birmingham, Ala.; Works Progress Administration, 1937.

Papers;

The papers of Maud McLure Kelly are held by the library at Samford University.

KELLY, RILEY NICHOLAS, 1926-2014

Biography:

Journalist, poet. Born– Oct. 16, 1926, Excel, Ala. Parents– Riley Jacob Daniel and Rosalie (Nicholas) Kelly. Education– Emory University, B.A., 1949. U.S. Navy, 1943-1946; teacher, Veterans Administration, 1950-1951; Frisco City Sun; Monroe Journal; regional correspondent for three other Alabama newspapers, 1951-1961; Announcer and Program Director, WMFC radio, Monroeville; partner, Kelly Mill Mercantile Co., Repton, Ala. Member; Alabama State Poetry Society; Alabama State Council on the Arts and Humanities; Pensters (Mobile-Fairhope). Died December 11, 2014.

Source:

SCROD 1; Who’s Who in Alabama, Vol. III; ancestry.com

Publication(s):

The Human Way. New York; Exposition Press, 1974.

In Search of Light. New York; Exposition Press, 1969.

Patterns; Poetry. New York; Exposition Press, 1970.

Prize Cache. New York; Exposition Press, 1974.

KENNAMER, JOHN ROBERT, SR., 1873-1952

Biography;

Postmaster; teacher; merchant; historian.  Born–January 12, 1873, Kennamer’s Cove.  Parents–David and Kitty Lewis (Hodges) Kennamer.  Married–Sarah Elizabeth Page, September 30, 1896.  Children–nine.  Education: Green Academy, Nat., Al.; Tri-State Normal College, Scottsboro, B. S., 1896.  Teacher in Marshall County for ten years.  Partner in mercantile business, seven years.  Postmaster, Woodville, Al., 1903-1946.  Served a term on local school board.  Founded the Kennamer Family Association of Alabama, Inc.; editor, The Kennamer Family Bulletin. Died April 6, 1952.

Source:

Owen’s The Story of Alabama, Vol. IV; The Story of Woodville and Community Album.

Publications;

History of Jackson County, Alabama.  Winchester, Tenn.:  Southern Printing and Publishing Co., 1935.

The Story of Woodville and Community Album.  Lanett, Al.:  East Alabama Publishing Co.,1950.

Joint_Editor;

The Kennamer Family.  Nashville:  McQuiddy Printing Co., 1924.

 

KENNAMER, LORRIN GARFIELD, 1897-1966

Biography:

Teacher. Born– June 27, 1897, Marshall County, Ala. Parents– John Robert and Sarah Elizabeth (Page) Kennamer. Married– Ruie Lee Hart. Children– Three. Education–Peabody Institute, M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. Teacher, Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College, 1928-retirement. Author of syndicated articles and radio speaker. Died May 6, 1966.

Source:

Owen’s The Story of Alabama.

Publication(s):

The Geography of the Callahan Divide; a Study in the Adjustment of Industry to Environment. Nashville; George Peabody College for Teachers, 1932.

Joint_Publication(s):

Geography. Austin, Texas; Steck, 1962.

Joint_Editor:

Geography as a Professional Field. Washington, D.C.; U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of Education, 1966.

Kennamer Family History. Nashville; McQuiddy Printing Co., 1924.

KENNAMER, SAMUEL REXFORD, 1920-2013

Biography:

Physician. Born– July 4, 1920, Guntersville, Ala. Parents– Charles Brents and Birdie (Hooper) Kennamer. Moved to Montgomery in 1931, when his father became federal judge for the Middle District of Alabama. Education– University of Alabama, B.A., 1942; Jefferson Medical College, M.D., 1945; interned at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Fla., 1945-1946. U.S. Army Medical Corps, 1947-1949; Residency, U.S. Veterans Hospital, McKinney, Tex., 1947-1950; fellowship in cardiology at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital and UCLA Medical School; practiced in Beverly Hills, Calif., 1954-2008.  Treated many celebrity patients; known as the “doctor to the stars.” Published more than 50 articles and presented over 25 papers before 1979. Fellow; American College of Cardiology; American College of Chest Physicians, and other medical associations.  Founder and President of the Western Cardiac Foundation.  The Foundation set up the S. Rexford Kennamer Endowed Lectureship in Internal Medicine in Montgomery, bringing professional speakers to address doctors and medical students.  The Albert B. Parvin Foundation established the Kennamer Fellows Program in Internal Medicine at UCLA and Cedars-Sinai Medical Centers in his honor. Died September 28, 2013.

Source:

SCRIPSIT; Biographical Directory of the American College of Physicians; obituary, Montgomery Advertiser,  October 3, 2013.

Joint_Publication(s):

Accelerated Conduction. New York; Grune & Stratton, 1952.

Auricular Arrhythmias. Springfield, Ill.; Charles C. Thomas, 1952.

Contributor;

Heart Care, edited by Morris Fishbein. Garden City, N.Y.; Hanover House, 1966.

KENNEDY, JO MYRLE COLBURN, 1927-2009

Biography:

Teacher, lecturer. Born September 8, 1927,  Greensboro, Ala. Married– Robert J. Kennedy, Selma, Ala. Children– Four. Education– Alabama College at Montevallo; University of Alabama, B.S. in secondary education, 1949; George Wallace Community College. Teacher in Selma schools; private piano teacher; organist at several Protestant churches and at the Jewish Temple in Selma; lectured on the French settlements in Alabama and Mississippi. Member; Toastmasters International.  Died December 11, 1009.

Source:

Dauphin Island; French Possession; obituary.

Publication(s):

Dauphin Island; French Possession, 1699-1980. Huntsville, Ala.; Strode, 1980.

KENNEDY, WALTER WALLACE, 1898-1978

Biography:

Banker; attorney; civic leader.  Born– Dec. 20, 1898, Birmingham, Ala.; Parents– Hughes B. and Katherine (Hausman) Kennedy. Married– Myra Belle Pope, Sept. 18, 1926. Children– Three. Education– University of Alabama, B.S. and LL.B.; Rutgers University, Graduate School of Banking. U.S. Army in World War I; U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; retired in 1959 with the rank of colonel. Practiced law in Birmingham, 1921-29; worked in the Trust Department of the First National Bank of Montgomery, 1929-35;  joined  the First National Bank of Montgomery as Vice-President and Trust Officer, 1935; became president in 1948 and Chairman of the Board in 1964.  Taught, American Institute of Banking; taught, Louisiana State University, School of Banking of the South. Active in civic and religious organizations in Montgomery; Senior Warden, Episcopal Church of the Ascension; Board of Regents, Rutgers University, Graduate School of Banking; president, Alabama Banking Association; Administrative Committee, American Bankers Association. A gifted amateur artist, his paintings were exhibited at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts. Elected to the Alabama Academy of Honor, 1977. Died January 2, 1978.

Source:

Library of Alabama Lives, 1961; files at Alabama Public Library Service; website of Alabama Academy of Honor.

Publication(s):

Bank Management. Boston; Bankers Pub. Co., 1958.

KENNY, MICHAEL S., 1863-1946

Biography:

Clergyman. Born– June 28, 1863,  Glankeen, Tipperary, Ireland. Parents– Dermot Shelley and Kathleen (Maders) Kenny. Education– Crescent and Mungret College, Limerick; Royal Irish University; Divinity Schools of Dublin and Ghent; Fordham University, Ph.D.   Emigrated to the United States in 1886, naturalized in 1892. Ordained in the Roman Catholic Church, 1897. Taught at Spring Hill College in Alabama, Loyola University in New Orleans, La., and Creighton University in Omaha, Neb.; lectured extensively; moved to New York in 1908 and co-founded America, a Catholic weekly, and was its associate editor until 1915. In his 50th Jesuit year, the governor of Louisiana, the mayor of New Orleans, and some 200 graduates of Loyola University gathered at a public reception for him.  Awarded the Litt. D. by Spring Hill College, 1930. Died November 12, 1946.

Source:

Owen’s The Story of Alabama; Mobile Press Register, 1946.

Publication(s):

American Masonry and Catholic Education. New Orleans, La.; Holy Spirit Society, 1919.

Catholic Culture in Alabama; Centenary Story of Spring Hill College, 1830-1930. New York; America Press, 1931.

Ireland’s Case; …. New Orleans, La.; Morning Star Pub., 1919.

The Martyrs of Virginia, 1571. Richmond, Va.; Society for the Propagation of the Faith of the Diocese of Richmond, 1936.

The Mexican Crisis; Its Causes and Consequences. Brooklyn, N.Y.; International Catholic Truth Society, 1927?

No God Next Door; Red Rule in Mexico and Our Responsibility. New York; William J. Hirten Co., 1935.

Pedro Martinez, S.J., Martyr in Florida, 1565; Jesuit Protomartyr of the New World. St. Leo, Fla.; Abbey Press, 1939.

The Romance of the Floridas; the Finding and Founding. Milwaukee; Bruce, 1934.

Joint_Publication(s):

Glankeen of Borrisoleigh, Tipperary Parish. Dublin; J. Duffy & Co., 1944.

KENT, DAVID (Pseudonym)

See:

Birney, Herman Hoffman

KERNODLE, GEORGE RILEY, 1907-1988

Biography:

Theater director, professor of theatre.  Born– Mar. 17, 1907, Camp Hill, Ala. Parents– Julius Arthur and Anne (Slaughter) Kernodle. Married– Portia Baker. Education– St. Lawrence University, B.S., 1926; Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1926-1928; Columbia University, 1928-1929; University of Chicago, M.A.; Yale University, Ph.D., 1937. Taught at Ball State Teachers College, 1930-1932; Western Reserve University, 1936-1945; University of Iowa, 1945-1950; University of Tulsa, 1950-1952; University of Arkansas, 1952-74. Visiting professor appointments at several universities; Sterling Fellow in Europe, 1938-1939; Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship, 1939; Arkansas Alumni Association Award, 1973. Member; American Theater Association; American Society for Theater Research. Directed over 100 plays; translated and produced eight Moliere plays. Died January 30, 1988.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online

Publication(s):

From Art to Theatre. Chicago; University of Chicago Press, 1944.

Invitation to the Theatre. New York; Harcourt, 1967.

The Miser; a New Version with Songs in the Style of the Period as Produced at the State University of Iowa, March 18, 1946. Iowa City, Iowa; s.n., 1946.

Perspectives in the Renaissance Theatre; the Pictorial Sources and the Development of Scenic Forms. New Haven, Conn.; Yale University Press, 1937.

Theatre in History. Fayetteville, Ark.; University of Arkansas Press, 1989.

Joint_Publication(s):

The Renaissance Stage. Coral Gables, Fla.; University of Miami Press, 1958.

Papers;

A collection of the papers of George Riley Kernodle is held by the Special Collections Department at the Library of the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, Arkansas.

KHATRI, ABDULLAH AHMED, 1924-2009

Biography:

Sociologist, university professor. Born– Aug. 3, 1924, Mandvi-Kutch, India. Parents– Ahmed Ismail and Aminabai Sueleman Khatri. Married– Manju Dedhia, Aug. 25, 1967. Children– Two. Education– Bombay University, B.A., 1946, LL.B., 1948, M.A., 1949, M.Sc., 1956; University of London, Ph.D., 1970. Taught at Samaldas College in Bhavanagar, India, 1949-1950; employed, Government of Bombay Guidance Bureau, 1950-1951; employed, B.M. Institute in Ahmedabad, India, 1957-1965; taught psychology and sociology,  Jacksonville State University, 1965-1967; University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1970-. Fulbright Senior Scholar, 1965-1967. Member; International Sociological Association; American Sociological Association. Awarded emeritus status on his retirement at UAB. Died March 7, 2009.

Source:

Who’s Who in the South and Southwest, 1978. Obituary, Birmingham News, March 9, 2009.

Publication(s):

Marriage and Family, Relations Throughout Literature. Bayside, N.Y.; General Hall, Inc., 1983.

Joint_Publication(s):

Perspectives on Marriage and the Family. Lexington, Mass.; Xerox College Publishing, 197-.

KILPATRICK, CARROLL, 1913-1984

Biography:

Journalist, writer. Born– Sept. 2, 1913, Montgomery, Ala. Parents– Andrew Carroll and Mary (Anderson) Kilpatrick. Married– Frances Talbot Williams, Mar. 6, 1941. Children– Two. Education– University of Alabama, A.B., 1935; graduate study, Harvard University, 1939-1940. Reporter, 1935-1937, Washington correspondent, 1939-1943, Birmingham News and Age-Herald; Associate editor and European correspondent, Montgomery Advertiser, 1937-1939; Washington correspondent, Raleigh News and Observer and Yorkshire Post, 1940-1943; correspondent, Chicago Sun, 1943-1946; correspondent, San Francisco Chronicle, 1946-1951; national affairs writer, Newsweek, 1940; assistant chief, U.S. State Dept. press section, 1951-1952; staff writer and White House correspondent, Washington Post, 1952-1975; freelance writer, 1975-. Merriman Smith Award for best White House correspondence from the White House Correspondents Association, 1971; Woodrow Wilson National Fellow, 1974. President, White House Correspondents Association; member, Overseas Writers Association. Died March 24, 1984.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online

Editor:

Roosevelt and Daniels; a Friendship in Politics. Chapel Hill, N.C.; University of North Carolina Press, 1952.

Joint_Editor:

The Kennedy Circle. Washington, D.C.; Luce, 1961.

KILPATRICK, EMMETT, 1890-1968

Biography:

Legislator,  professor, attorney. Born– Nov. 20, 1890, Camden, Ala. Parents– John Young and May (Carleton) Kilpatrick. Education– Maryville College, B.A.; Johns Hopkins University, M.A., 1923; University of Paris, Ph.D., 1924; post graduate work at the University of Mexico City and University of Rennes in France. Practiced law in Camden before World War I; enlisted in the U.S. Army and went to France where he worked as an interpreter; assigned to the Peace Conference team at the end of the war.  Worked for the Red Cross in Eastern Europe.  In 1920, he was with a Y.M.C.A. unit connected with the White Army in South Russia; captured by the Bolsheviks and held for a year. Sentenced to death as a spy, he slipped a message out in the clothing of a prisoner being released, and the U.S. government demanded and obtained his release. Returned to Camden and practiced law; served in the Alabama Legislature from Perry County, 1923-27; taught at the University of South Carolina, 1925-36; at Troy State University, (head of the English Department), 1937-61.  Died September 25, 1968.

Source:

Owen’s The Story of Alabama.

Publication(s):

The Political History of Alabama During the War of Secession. Paris; E. de Boccard, 1924.

KIMBALL, SOLON TOOTHAKER, 1909-1982

Biography:

Anthropologist, professor of anthropology. Born– Aug. 12, 1909, Manhattan, Kan. Parents– Charles A. and Matie (Toothaker) Kimball. Married– Hannah J. Price, Dec. 24, 1935. Children– Two. Education– Kansas State University, B.S., 1930; Harvard University, A.M., 1933, Ph.D., 1936. Section head, U.S. Govt. Office of Indian Affairs, Window Rock, Ariz., 1936-1942; employed, War Relocation Authority, Washington, DC, 1942-1945; taught, Michigan State University, 1945-1948; University of Alabama, 1948-1953; Teachers College of Columbia University, 1953-1966; University of Florida, 1966-80. Visiting professor at various universities; consultant to universities and research centers. Did anthropological research in Ireland, Michigan, Alabama, and the Navajo nation. Founding member of the Society for Applied Anthropology; member and president of the American Ethnological Society. Social Science Research Council faculty fellowship, 1961-1962; Guggenheim Fellowship, 1966-1967; awarded the D.Sc., Kansas State University, 1963.  The American Anthropological Association established the Solon T. Kimball Award, given biannually to an anthropologist who effects change in public policy.  Died October 12, 1982.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online; Kansapedia

Publication(s):

Community Government in War Relocation Centers. Washington, D.C.; Government Printing Office, 1946.

The Craft of Community Study; Fieldwork Dialogues. Gainesville, Fla.; University of Florida Press, 1979.

Culture and the Educative Process. New York; Teachers College Press, 1974.

Editor:

Readings in the Science of Human Relations. Tuscaloosa, Ala.; University of Alabama Press, 1949.

Joint_Editor:

Crossing Cultural Boundaries. San Francisco; Chandler Pub. Co., 1972.

Culture and Community. New York; Harcourt, 1965.

Education and the New America. New York; Random House, 1962.

Family and Community in Ireland. Cambridge, Mass.; Harvard University Press, 1940.

Learning and Culture. Seattle; University of Washington Press, 1973.

The Talladega Story. Tuscaloosa, Ala.; University of Alabama Press, 1954.

KIMBROUGH, WILLIAM EDWARD, 1918-1965

Biography:

University professor, writer. Born– Aug. 15, 1918, Meridian, Miss. Parents–William Edward Kimbrough Sr. and Daisy Ridgell Kimbrough. Education– University of Alabama, A.B., M.A. Taught, University of Alabama, 1941-1965. Julius Rosenwald fellowship, 1943; Houghton Mifflin literary fellowship, 1944. Member; Phi Beta Kappa. Died April 6, 1965.

Source:

Harry A. Warfel, American Novelists of Today, 1951; files at Alabama Public Library Service; ancestry.com.

Publication(s):

From Hell to Breakfast. Philadelphia; Lippincott, 1941.

Nightfire. New York; Rinehart, 1946.

The Secret Pilgrim. New York; Rinehart, 1949.

KING, CASSANDRA, 1944-

Biography;

College instructor; writer. Born February 18, 1944.  Married–Pat Conroy, 1997.  Children–three.  Education:  Alabama College, B.A., 1967; University of Montevallo, M.F.A., 1988.  Taught English Composition at the University of Montevallo.

Source;

Contemporary Authors online

Publications;

Making Waves in Zion.  Montgomery: Black Belt Press, 1995. (Published as Making Waves, New York: Hyperion, 2003.)

Moonrise. New York:  Hyperion, 2013.

Queen of Broken Hearts.  New York: Hyperion, 2007.

The Same Sweet Girls.  New York:  Hyperion, 2005.

The Sunday Wife. New York:  Hyperion, 2005.

KING, CLINTON PATRICK, 1918-2007

Biography:

Merchant seaman; genealogist. Born– Nov. 7, 1918, Lauderdale County, Miss. Parents– William Richard and Mattie Caroline (Mosley) King. Married– Dorothy Valentina Terrell, June 3, 1961. Education– East Central Junior College, Decatur, Miss., 1937-1938; University of South Alabama, 1970-1973. Served in U.S. Merchant Marine, 1941 to retirement in 1968; genealogical and local history researcher after 1975; historical research consultant, University of South Alabama, 1980-1985. Died August 12, 2007.

Source:

Clinton P. King, Mobile, Ala.

Publication(s):

Abstracts of Orphans Court Minutes, Mobile County, Alabama. Mobile, Ala.; Alabama Ancestors, 1987-

Transcriptions of Wills, Mobile County, Alabama. Mobile, Ala.; Alabama Ancestors, 1988.

Joint_Compiler_and_Editor

Marriages of Mobile County, Alabama, 1813-1855. Baltimore; Genealogical Pub. Co., 1985.

Marriages of Mobile County, Alabama, 1856-1870. Mobile, Ala.; Alabama Ancestors, 1985.

Naturalization Records of Mobile, Alabama, 1833-1906. Baltimore; Gateway Press, 1986.

Contributor;

Stryker-Rodda, Kenn.  Genealogical Research; Methods and Resources.  Washington, DC:  American Society of Genealogists, 1983.

 

KING, CORETTA SCOTT, 1927- 2006

Biography:

Musician, civil rights leader. Born– Apr. 27, 1927, Heiberger, Perry County, Ala. Parents– Obie and Bernice (McMurry) Scott. Married– Martin Luther King, Jr., June 18, 1953. Children– Four. Education– Antioch College, B.A.; New England Conservatory of Music, B.Mus. Voice instructor, Morris Brown College, Atlanta, 1962; sometimes substituted as a speaker for her husband during the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Organized the Freedom Concert, inaugurated at Town Hall in New York in 1964, and presented more than thirty such programs with benefits going to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Center. Member; Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom; National Council of Negro Women; Women Strike for Peace; United Church Women; Alpha Kappa Alpha. President, Martin Luther King, Jr. Foundation and Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Center. Member, Board of directors of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the National Organization for Women. Received honorary doctorates from Boston College, Princeton University, and many other institutions. Died January 30, 2006.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online

Publication(s):

My Life with Martin Luther King, Jr. New York; Holt, 1969.

Compiler_and_Editor;

Martin Luther King Jr. Companion:  Quotations from the Speeches, Essays, and Books.  New York:  St. Martins Press, 1993.

Papers;

Papers of Coretta Scott King are included in the King Papers held by the King Center in Atlanta.

Words of Martin Luther King Jr.  New York:  Newmarket Press, 1983.

KING, MARTIN LUTHER, JR., 1929-1968

Biography:

Clergyman; civil rights leader. Born– Jan. 15, 1929, Atlanta, Ga. Parents– Martin Luther and Alberta (Williams) King. Married– Coretta Scott, June 18, 1953. Children– Four. Education– Morehouse College, A.B., 1948; Crozer Theological Seminary, B.D., 1951; Boston University, Ph.D., 1955; additional study at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard University. Ordained a Baptist minister, 1948; Pastor, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Montgomery, Ala., 1950-60; co-pastor, Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta, 1960-68.  Vice-President, National Sunday School and Baptist Training Conference, National Baptist Convention.  Led the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s; President, Montgomery Improvement Association;  Founder and president (1957-68), Southern Christian Leadership Conference.  J. Louis Crozer fellowship at Crozer Theological Seminary. Spingarn Medal, NAACP, 1957; Time Man of the Year, 1963.  awarded the L.H.D. by Morehouse College, Howard University, Morgan State College and Central State College; awarded an honorary D.D. by Boston University and by Chicago Theological Seminary; Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1977.  Nobel Peace Prize, 1964. Died Apr. 4, 1968.

Source:

Who Was Who in America online; Contemporary Authors online

Publication(s):

Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.  Warner Books, 1998.

I’ve Been to the Mountaintop.  HarperSanFrancisco, 1994.

Letter from Birmingham City Jail.  American Friends Service Committee, 1963.

Measure of a Man.  Christian Education Press, 1959; memorial edition, Pilgrim Press, 1968.

Pilgrimage to Nonviolence.  Fellowship of Reconciliation, 1960.

Strength to Love. New York; Harper, 1964.

Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? Harper, 1967.

Why We Can’t Wait.  Harper, 1964.

Stride Toward Freedom; the Montgomery Story. New York; Harper, 1958.

Where Do We Go From Here; Chaos or Community? New York; Harper, 1967.

Why We Can’t Wait. New York; Harper, 1964.

Papers;

The papers of Martin Luther King Jr. are held by the King Center in Atlanta.

KING, RICHARD G., 1922-

Biography:

Educator. Born– Dec. 31, 1922, Cambridge, Mass. Parents– John Fitch and Hilda (Clark) King. Married– Mary Louise Mears, June 21, 1944. Children– Two. Education– Williams College, A.B., 1943; Harvard University, M.A., 1950, Ed.D., 1958. U.S. Navy Submarine Service, 1943-1946; high school teacher, South Byfield, Mass., 1946-1948; director, Office of Tests, Harvard, 1952-1954; assistant director, College Entrance Examination Board, 1954-1956; associate director of admissions and financial aid, Harvard, 1956-1960; director, Office for Graduate Career Plans, Harvard, 1960-1966; lecturer in education and research associate, Center for the Study of Education and Development, 1963-1970; coordinator of a high school project in Nigeria, 1963-1964; field director of a Central American project in higher education, 1964-1965; taught, University of Alabama in Birmingham, 1970-.  Member American Statistical Association; National Council on Measurement in Education; American Association for the Advancement of Science; American Education Studies Association; Psychometrice Society; Alabama Education Association.  Consultant to the Ford Foundation.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online

Joint_Publication(s):

The Technology of Instruction in Mexican Universities. New York; Education and World Affairs, 1968.

The Provincial Universities of Mexico; an Analysis of Growth and Development. New York; Praeger, 1971.

KING, SPENCER BIDWELL, 1904-1977

Biography:

Historian, teacher, editor. Born– Feb. 19, 1904, Birmingham, Ala. Parents– Spencer Bidwell and Lizzie (Dodson) King. Married– Caroline Janet Paul, Dec. 26, 1934. Children– Three. Education– Mercer University, A.B., 1929; George Peabody College, M.A., 1936; University of North Carolina, Ph.D., 1950; additional study at Emory University, Vanderbilt University, and University of Michigan. Taught at Mars Hill College, 1933-1943; Mercer University, 1946-73, chair, History Dept., 1946-1970. Visiting summer professor at Furman, Emory, University of Georgia. Chairman of the board of editors for Ardivan Press in Macon, Ga.; columnist, Macon Telegraph and News; Georgia editor, Encyclopedia of Southern Baptists; contributor, Encyclopaedia Britannica and Colliers Encyclopedia. Carnegie grant, 1950; United Daughters of the Confederacy Award, 1962, for contribution to Southern literature; Dixie Council of Authors and Journalists Award, 1968; Georgia Writers’ Association First Prize, 1969; Daughters of Colonial Wars Teacher Award, 1973. The annual Spencer B. King Distinguished Professor Award is given each year at Mercer in his honor. Awarded professor emeritus status at Mercer, 1973. Died December 4, 1977.

Source:

Contemporary Authors online; Marquis Who’s Who online.

Publication(s):

Darien; the Death and Rebirth of a Southern Town. Macon, Ga.; Mercer University Press, 1981.

Ebb Tide as Seen Through the Diary of Josephine C. Habersham. Athens, Ga.; University of Georgia Press, 1958.

Georgia Voices; a Documentary History to 1872. Athens, Ga; University of Georgia Press, 1966.

Selective Service in North Carolina in World War II. Chapel Hill, N.C.; University of North Carolina Press, 1949.

Silver Anniversary History of the Ingleside Baptist Church, 1951-1976, Macon, Ga. S.l.; s.n., 1976.

Sound of Drums; Selected Writings of Spencer B. King. Macon, Ga.; Mercer University Press, 1984.

Joint_Publication(s):

History of Georgia. S.l.; American Book Co., 1954.

Editor:

Eliza Andrews’ Wartime Journal of a Georgia Girl. Macon, Ga.; Ardivan Press, 1960.

John C. Butler’s Historical Record of Macon and Central Georgia. Macon, Ga.; J.W. Burke, 1958.

Rebel Lawyer; the Letters of Theodorick W. Montfort. Athens, Ga.; University of Georgia Press, 1966.

KIRBY, LELIAS EUGENE, 1895-1977

Biography:

Physician. Born– Oct. 28, 1895, Etowah County, Ala. Parents– Lasley Stewart and Nannie Lee (Spradley) Kirby. Married– Jean Harms, Aug. 19, 1927. Children– Three. Education– University of Alabama, B.S., 1924; Emory University, M.D., 1926.  U.S. Army, WWI. Organized the Wesley Foundation; served on the Jefferson County, Alabama Board of Education and the Board of Trustees of Huntingdon College; founded East End Memorial Hospital in Birmingham, 1947. Held most offices in the Methodist Church and taught an adult Sunday School class. Wrote a weekly newspaper column for many years.  Died October 5, 1977.

Source:

Grove’s Library of Alabama Lives.

Publication(s):

Corncobs, Cockleburs and Country Boys. Nashville; Williams, 1973.

Cotton Pickin’ Coon Huntin’ Country Boys. Birmingham, Ala.; Cather Pub. Co., 1975.

How Me and Amos Won World War I. Birmingham, Ala.; Commercial Printing Co., 1975.

KIRK, DOLLY WILLIAMS, 1862-1941

Biography:

Teacher. Born– Oct. 28, 1862, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Parents– George Hamilton and Julia Anne (Owen) Kirk. Education–Girls’ Central High School, New Orleans; Sophie Newcomb College; Chautauqua, New York; University of Michigan; Columbia University. Taught in the grammar schools of Montgomery beginning in 1894, later became a member of the Sidney Lanier High School faculty; became head of the English department, 1917. Joined the faculty at the University of Alabama, 1929. Won the annual prize of the Alabama State Federation of Womens Clubs in 1903 with a Shakespearean paper; contributed poems and stories to magazines. Member; Daughters of the American Revolution; Tintagil Literary Club (a literary society for young ladies, founded in Montgomery in 1896). Died February  9, 1941.

Source:

Owen’s The Story of Alabama, Vol. 3; Marquis who’s who online; findagrave.com

Joint_Publication(s):

With Spurs of Gold; Heroes of Chivalry and Their Deeds. Boston; Little Brown, 1905.