Camera Lenses

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Under construction.
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==Inventory==
  
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We currently have three different types of Canon lenses:
  
==Using Lenses==
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* '''EF 50mm (3) -- standard telephoto lens''' -- prone to focus blur around the edges of a capture, especially the bottom edge
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* '''EF 100mm (1) -- macro lens''' -- deals with light pollution very well but captures limited material sizes
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* '''EF 14mm (2) -- ultra wide angle lens''' -- susceptible to light pollution but can capture very large material sizes
  
===Overview===
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Each lens works differently and produces an image with different characteristics. See [[Cameras]] for notes on compatibility.
We currently have three different types of lenses for use with the Canon cameras. 100mm Macro, 50mm, and 14mm wide-angle. Each lens works differently and produces an image with different characteristics. Each lens also has settings that will produce optimal quality images.
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==Settings==
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Each lens has settings that will produce optimal quality images. The image below is a screenshot from EOS Utility, showing where the shutter speed and aperture display. Right-clicking on either button will allow you to change the value for that setting.
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[[Image:Shutterspeed-and-aperture.PNG]]
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===F-stop (Aperture)===
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Optimal settings:
  
===Optimal F-stop settings===
 
* 100mm Macro: '''f/8.0'''
 
 
* 50mm: '''f/5.6'''
 
* 50mm: '''f/5.6'''
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* 100mm Macro: '''f/8.0'''
 
* 14mm Wide-angle: '''f/8.0'''
 
* 14mm Wide-angle: '''f/8.0'''
  
===Setting Aperture Value===
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===Shutter Speed===
* In EOS Utility, using the Depth-of-Field Preview, place the color card on the table and look at the histogram in the Live View window. The last peak on the histogram (reflecting the white square of the color card) should be in the middle of the last section of the histogram.
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* Each section of the histogram is a range of 50 points. If you shoot for the middle of the last section(200-250), you'll be somewhere around 225. Anything from 220-235 is on target for white.
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* If your white is out of range, tinker with the aperture setting until the histogram reflects that the white is in range.
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Optimal settings:
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There is no one optimal setting. Visualize exposure in EOS Utility to determine the correct setting during each capture session, which will be influenced by F-stop setting, lighting, and whether you're using glass.
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Setting shutter speed:
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* In EOS Utility, click on Depth-of-Field Preview, then place the color card on the table and look at the histogram in the Live View window. The last peak on the histogram (reflecting the white square of the color card) should be in the middle of the last section of the histogram.
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[[image:EOS-Utility-histogram.PNG]]
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* Each section of the histogram is a range of 50 points. If you shoot for the middle of the last section(200-250), you'll be somewhere around 225. Anything from 220-235 is on target for white.
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* If your white is out of range, right click on the shutter speed and adjust it until the histogram reflects that the white is in range.
  
 
==Examples==
 
==Examples==
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===F-stop focus blur===
 
===F-stop focus blur===
 
The images below show the chromatic aberration effects of low aperture number f-stop settings on the quality of image focus.
 
The images below show the chromatic aberration effects of low aperture number f-stop settings on the quality of image focus.
[[Image:14mm_7d_fstop_comparison.png]] [[Image:50mm_5dmk3_fstop_comparison.png]]
 
  
===Aperture Values==
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[[Image:14mm_7d_fstop_comparison.png]] [[Image:50mm_5dmk3_fstop_comparison.png]]
Below are captures from the 100mm lens, at f/8.0 but with different aperture values.
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Revision as of 13:34, 12 February 2014

Contents

Inventory

We currently have three different types of Canon lenses:

  • EF 50mm (3) -- standard telephoto lens -- prone to focus blur around the edges of a capture, especially the bottom edge
  • EF 100mm (1) -- macro lens -- deals with light pollution very well but captures limited material sizes
  • EF 14mm (2) -- ultra wide angle lens -- susceptible to light pollution but can capture very large material sizes

Each lens works differently and produces an image with different characteristics. See Cameras for notes on compatibility.


Settings

Each lens has settings that will produce optimal quality images. The image below is a screenshot from EOS Utility, showing where the shutter speed and aperture display. Right-clicking on either button will allow you to change the value for that setting.

Shutterspeed-and-aperture.PNG

F-stop (Aperture)

Optimal settings:

  • 50mm: f/5.6
  • 100mm Macro: f/8.0
  • 14mm Wide-angle: f/8.0

Shutter Speed

Optimal settings:

There is no one optimal setting. Visualize exposure in EOS Utility to determine the correct setting during each capture session, which will be influenced by F-stop setting, lighting, and whether you're using glass.

Setting shutter speed:

  • In EOS Utility, click on Depth-of-Field Preview, then place the color card on the table and look at the histogram in the Live View window. The last peak on the histogram (reflecting the white square of the color card) should be in the middle of the last section of the histogram.

EOS-Utility-histogram.PNG

  • Each section of the histogram is a range of 50 points. If you shoot for the middle of the last section(200-250), you'll be somewhere around 225. Anything from 220-235 is on target for white.
  • If your white is out of range, right click on the shutter speed and adjust it until the histogram reflects that the white is in range.

Examples

F-stop focus blur

The images below show the chromatic aberration effects of low aperture number f-stop settings on the quality of image focus.

14mm 7d fstop comparison.png 50mm 5dmk3 fstop comparison.png

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