The University of Alabama
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The Tuskegee University Archives includes material documenting the history and growth of Tuskegee University. Books (including faculty publications), manuscripts, Tuskegee University periodicals and newspapers, ephemera, photographic images, disc and tape recordings, and other archival items are available for research under supervised conditions. For more information, contact archives@tuskegee.edu or contact the archivist at (334) 725-2374. More information may be located online at http://www.tuskegee.edu/global/Story.asp?s=10237696.
Letters to Lewis J. Tutt, the New Jersey Deputy Prohibition Administrator, praising his work for prohibition.
A letter from Tutwiler recommending a student for a teaching position at an unidentified school in Cahaba, Alabama
Contains three notebooks: an account book recording tuition payments at Greensboro Academy; a second account book documenting Henry Tutwiler's personal expenses; and a commonplace book containing book reviews, weather reports, and very brief entries about the Civil War.
Notebook from the first Julia Tutwiler Tea
Minutes and yearbooks of this Tuscaloosa, Alabama, women's study club.
Ann Tyler of Gadsden, Alabama writes to friend Carrie Wadlington of Charleston, South Carolina. The focus of the conversation is on local marriages with some vague attention to future travel plans.
In this letter, Lizzie Tyler asks her sister to visit and tells her about her children and daily activities at home.
An envelope from the Tyree Springs Hotel in Hendersonville, Tennessee featuring the water's curative properties.
Uncle Bud writes from Camp Lee, Virginia, to Edward Gilmore in New Castle, Pennsylvania. Bud writes that the Army does not pay well and expresses his hope to see Gilmore at Christmas.
Fragment of an illustrated German translation of Uncle Tom's Cabin.
The Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity Conference is an annual event at The University of Alabama that allows undergraduates to highlight their work in research or creative fields. This collection contains presentations deposited by conference participants to the University Libraries since 2009.
Letter fragment from unidentified author writes about winter and the military ball.
Fragment of a letter written to unidentified family members by an unidentifiable correspondent.
Drawing of an unidentified man. Picture is extremely fragile, handle only if necessary.
Two sheets (26" x 20") of black and white prints produced by the Union Furniture Company in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, depicting historical homes and buildings in Tuscaloosa and Northport, Alabama.
This collection consists of a fragment of a letter written by an unknown Union soldier, describing his thoughts about the draft--"I think it is right for every man to help save his country"--, emancipation--"I am against freeing the Negro just as mutch [sic] as any person"--and the Battle of Gettysburg--"that was my forth [sic] of July". Very poorly written and virtually illegible in places.
The collection consists of one letter from a soldier to his mother, written from "Washington City", DC (SC?), 7 December 1866. The accompanying envelope is postmarked Washington DC, 24 April, suggesting that it does not belong with the letter. The envelope is addressed to Mrs. Dicy Hicks [sic], of Jonesville, Lee County, Virginia. The letter furnishes few clues about its author, save for the fact that he was barely literate. A partially illegible closing seems to read "Company B 107 USCI," which could stand for the 107th U.S. Colored Infantry regiment. If so, then is it more likely to have been written in South Carolina than in Washington DC, as that regiment was stationed in the Department of the South following the Civil War's end. The body of the letter consists of little more than injunctions to pass the writer's greetings on to friends and family.
Records of the United Confederate Veterans Camp W. J. Hardee, in Birmingham, Alabama, between 1906 and 1919.
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