The University of Alabama
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Jane Kent used this notebook during her college studies of English: Shakespeare, Modern Drama, Essays of Francis Bacon, and classical poetry.
John L. Kent of Garnerville, New York, wrote to Lewis Ottenberg about stamp collecting. The letter is on common paper, but the elaborate letterhead appears to be hand drawn in black with green and yellow accents.
Three early 20th century postcards depict colorized photographic scenes of Louisville, Kentucky, with images of Union Depot, Wharfboat, and U.S. Life-Saving Station, and the City of Louisville steamboat. A fourth postcard depicts Boone's Ferry on the Kentucky River.
One letter written from Ma in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, to William Kenyon (presumably her son) in Lebanon, New Hampshire. She tells news of family and friends and mentions she and Pa will be home soon. Letter mentions a major fire in Canaan, New Hampshire.
Contains approximately fifty letters written by and to the King family of Dayton, Ohio. In addition to the letters written by family members, there are eleven letters from Helen Elie Smith, a onetime girlfriend of Robert Jr., and others from friends and extended family members. Early letters show the late engagement and young married life of Mr. and Mrs. King and include the letters they wrote to their young children while traveling. Many letters were written by the children during their years in various New England boarding schools. The sons also wrote of their experiences in the armed forces during World War II. Louis was stationed in New Orleans while Robert Jr. trained to be a pilot for the Air Transport Command in Las Vegas, New Mexico. The collection also includes newspaper clippings featuring various grandchildren, a telegram, a postcard, and promotional material for commemorative stamps.
Includes the papers of the King family of Perry County, Alabama, who owned plantations and other businesses.
I.A. King Guide to this collection )
A letter dated 21 March 1862, from the Marine Hospital in Vicksburg, Mississippi, to his brother. It requests money for tobacco and other necessaries. Printed on patriotic stationery; the last page has the song "Run , Yank, or Die," composed by T.W. Crowson of the Alabama Hickories, printed on it.
Color print of a drawing of Martin Luther King, Jr., by C. Downey that includes the poem He Changed the Course of History by Tommye Nious.
Letter to Lieutenant Colonal A.J. McKay from Lieutenant E.B. Kink, an officer serving in the United States Army during the Civil War at Camp Stevenson, Alabama. He discusses the condition of the camp, including the arrival of supplies of wagons and mules. He mentions needing more workmen and asks for help to get action taken on papers already sent to Washington.
Gideon Kinports LetterGuide to this collection )
This collection contains a letter from Gideon Kinports of Cherry Tree, Pennsylvania, to Eliza who is moving away from Cherry Tree. In it he expresses his deep feeling for her and includes a poem of his sentiments.
This collection consists of six letters from Corporal Menial Horton Kiser, United States Army, during World War II, to his family in Kentucky and Indiana. Also includes seven photographs.
Letters to Thomas Y. Knies of Chicago, Illinois, written between 1880 and 1889, from his "Cousin Jane," Wm. F. and Mary R. Cottle, Katie Bell Cooper ("Cousin Katie"), "friend Lizzie," and "Cousin C.S. Cooper." There are several undated letters to Thomas and a couple from Thomas to his Cousin Katie. There is also a letter from "Uncle Robt" telling of the death of Arthur along with Thomas' letter of condolence.
Letters from Army sergeant during World War Two to friend Lacey Ennis in Fitzgerald, Georgia, detailing service life in Africa, Italy, and France. Also includes four photos, three of which depict the author.
A letter from Edward Knox of Chicago, Illinois to Michael Knox of Nunda, Illinois about the health of friends and Edward's job.
Kolb Family Papers Guide to this collection )
John Frederick Kolb and Valentine Bruner Kolb were from Frederick County, Maryland, and fought for the Union in the Civil War. Valentine Kolb's letters to his family discuss battles, artillery, and prisoners; John F. Kolb's notification to enroll is included as well as a letter he wrote to his parents. Letters to their father are also included.
One letter written from George Kresal, stationed at a naval base in Apra Harbor, Guam, to his parents in Omro, Wisconsin. He wrote of daily life on base and service in the honor guard for the departure of Admiral George Murray.
Diary of Grandma Kroff of Akron, New York, given to her by Emma Kroff Yoder on 25 December 1931.
Two letters (one in German and one in English) from Maria Kruper of Munster, Westphalia, British Zone, Germany to relatives (family Herm. Kreienbrink) in Louisville, Kentucky in 1948. There is no translation available at this time for the letter in German.
Contains typewritten lyrics to thirteen Klan songs, many of which are based on patriotic, popular, or religious songs.
A letter from Alice M. Kunz to Jeanne Marsolek of Isabella, Minnesota about Alice's Peace Corps work as a librarian and English teacher in Kabul, Afghanistan.
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