The University of Alabama
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Approximately 300 letters sent to Emmett Carmichael by "renowned Americans," primarily from prominent physicians and university administrators from Alabama.
A miscellany of material relating to this University of Alabama president, including a newspaper clipping, a Carmichael writing entitled "The Function of Instinct in Education," and a scrapbook.
The 1914 University of Alabama commencement program of Omer Carmichael.
A contract dated 20 April 1950, with Charles Scribners Sons for her book, No Odds - No Victory.
Letter from Caroline in Henrico, Virginia, to her cousin. Discusses family and friends, including the medical problems one has, and criticizes the actions of the South and laments the problems in the Union.
A letter from J. Carr of Lynn, Massachusetts, to the N. N. Hill Brass Company about an order.
The collection contains a letter written by Carrie from Columbus to a friend about the women's actions against drinking. They were seen praying in saloons and sometimes on the sidewalks just outside.
Notarized document dated 22 April 1836, for sale of slaves in New Orleans by (Auguste) Carriere & (Daniel Gregoire) Borduzat to Prosper Foy.
Contains two undated letters written from this Alabama resident to Peter Brannon, most likely the director of the Alabama Department of Archives and History; two hand-written verses; and three printed cards with Christmas illustrations and poems written by Carroll.
This collection consists of two letters from C. A, Carson, Union Army soldier at "Camp near Sulphur Springs, Virginia (the extreme southwestern corner of the state, wedged between Kentucky and Tennessee), 12 September 1863, to his parents and brother. The letters are both on the same sheet of paper, and discuss, among other things, an episode of fraternization between Carson's unit and a Confederate force on the far side of a river. The accompanying envelope is postmarked Washington, DC, 15 September 1863, and addressed to S. L. Carson, South Dorridgewood, Maine.
Commonplace and letterbook, with early entries dating from 1823, includes hand-written poetry and by authors such as Shakespeare and Lord Byron. Later entries date from at least 1843 and include copies of letters that mention Mobile, Alabama, Mardi Gras societies.
The collection consists of reports and agendas for the annual, fall and spring meetings of the Carver Research Foundation Board of Trustees. Each report contains a list of the members of the Board of Trustees, addresses, and their professional positions. The reports also include detailed meeting agendas, reports by trustees and the Foundation director, financial reports, and other material describing activities of the Foundation.
Poster (37" x 25") of George Washington Carver by Betsy Graves Reyneau.
This collection consists of one letter from Luther K. Casey, Union soldier in Anderson Court House, South Carolina to his uncle, W. D. Barrell, in Turner, Maine, 16 October 1865. Discusses health of his fellow soldiers (evidently a part of the 1st Maine Battalion) , an incident in which three of his comrades were murdered, and denounces South Carolina as "the hardest Secesh hole in the whole south."
Letters from Sargeant Howard L. Cash to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Cash of Princeton, Kentucky, while he was stationed in England, France and Czechoslovakia. There is also a V-Mail letter from Bill, a nephew of the Cash's and a bill of sale for a 1941 Plymoth P11.
Marcia Cassady writes to her mother, Anna, from the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. She details the exhibits. Later C.A. Smith writes to Marcia about the vegetation of Florida where he vacations. He also mentions the Ohio floods.
One love letter from William Casttinan in Sanders, Kentucky, to Lura C. Baker in Verona, Kentucky.
Six catalogs of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Three are clothing catalogs, one is a plant catalog, one is an automobile supply catalog, and one is a biography/silverware catalog.
Four letters and three envelopes from Horace H. Catinna of Louisville, Kentucky, to Hattie F. Pryor also of Louisville, Kentucky. In these letters, Horace professes his love for Hattie.
This collection contains five postcards written to Merrill and Iris Caudry in Elgin, Illinois, from Mildred and Dwight (John) Caudry in Savanna, Illinois. The postcards discuss general news from home as well as a vacation or possible move by Mildred and Dwight to Texas.
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